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Knox Bowling Notes
for 2007-2008


CALLING ALL BOWLERS!!!

The Knox Bowling League will be starting again on September 4 at 6:00 PM.

There will be a short meeting before starting to bowl. The normal meeting time is 6:30.

The location is Bowl America Fairfax -- 9699 on the Lee Highway (Fairfax Circle Shopping Center).

We have four more openings.
We also are in need of substitutes from time to time.

Contact Steve Pida or Patty Webb
if you have any questions or would like to join the league.


Hint from Strikeability, Inc.

If you're one of those folks who bend your elbow too early in the follow through or would like to project the ball further down the lane on certain conditions, try this. Hold your arm down by your side. You'll see a crease on the inside of your elbow where the elbow bends. Think of leading the shot (your hand and ball) with this part of your elbow. You cannot biomechanically do this, of course, unless your elbow bends the opposite way of everyone else's! What's important is that you think lead with your elbow. Just feel like you are trying to have this crease of your elbow leading your hand toward the target. It will be very difficult to bend your elbow if the crease is going toward the target!


The ball should contact the lane
as though it were an airplane landing.

Cramming the ball INTO the lane instead of laying it ONTO the lane creates a very poor and inconsistent roll besides causing lane damage. That's why knee bend is so important. You've got to get  your body into a position to lay the ball down.

The more upright you are, the higher the position of the ball for delivery. Banging the ball on the lane is loud, embarrassing, and kills the roll. Other than that, it's a good idea.

* * *

More hook does not mean more strikes.
You must have the proper angle, speed, and rotation to carry a strike. If any of these components is off by a millimeter, a 1/2 mph, or half a revolution, your carry percentage goes down.

Don't be fooled into thinking more speed or more hook will do more to the pins. When a round object (the ball) hits a round object (the belly of the pin), funny things can happen.


* * *
It's almost impossible to hit your target if you're not looking at it.


Additionally, if you're not looking at it and you hit it, how will you know? Since you shouldn't make an adjustment unless you've thrown the ball pretty much like you wanted to and hit what you wanted to hit, you'll also not make a good adjustment.

There may be something that will screw you up worse than adjusting off a bad shot, but I can't think what it might be.

Just as much a part of the game
...


Solid 8 pins, ringing 10 pins, and swishing 7-10's are just as much a part of the game as Brooklyn strikes, messenger pins or rolling the bucket for a strike. Don't get crazy over it!

Over the long haul the player who makes the best shots will win.

It's just that the 'long haul' is not always a league night...         Strikeability, Inc.

Please keep this in mind your entire bowling life.


Every shot you have ever thrown is in your head. Every shot you have ever seen anyone else throw is in your head.
Every shot you have ever seen on television is in your head.

Those thousands and thousands of shots are quite an inventory. They are a wealth of information for you. With all of that experience in your head, how can you ever doubt a move that you decide to make?

Strikeability, Inc.

Something Else to think about:

  Your game is constantly evolving. It will not stay the same and it won't always be sharp.
Just when you think you don't have another 134 game left in you, out it comes.
Peak performance levels are cyclical. That's what causes slumps.
Bowling great doesn't last forever and neither does a slump.

 


BOWLING HUMOR

Supplemental Rules for Bowling

If you holler do "overs!" before the ball passes the arrows, you get to throw the ball over, unless of course, you get a strike. In which case, you can renege on the “do overs".

When your team is about 10 marks down in the 8th or 9th frame, you can invoke the rule "First Team through Bowling Wins the Game", and your team still has a chance.

After a member of the opposing team bowls 4 strikes in a row, he/she must bowl the next 4 frames blindfolded. If he/she continues to strike, his/her shoelaces will be tied together for 2 frames.

When you leave the 10-pin and you know you can't make the spare, but another member of your team can, invoke the "Designated Bowler" rule.

After you have 4 splits in one game, you may say "Kings X" and take those 4 frames over. However, if you split on the 2nd time around, you accept it. After all, "Fair is fair".

If your ball goes in the gutter and jumps back onto the lane, knocking down pins, by golly, you get them! That's much harder than to knock them down the conventional way. Good bowling should be recognized.

A ball should be declared dead when you bowl 3 games without a strike. It shall be the owner’s privilege to decide on the disposition of said dead ball - Burial at Sea, Dropped from an airplane over a live volcano, or a simple burial in the city dump. For a small fee, a league officer can be bribed to deliver a short eulogy.


The Spare Game


An old saying in bowling is, "make the spares, the strikes will come." This is especially good advice for new bowlers. There are 1,023 potential spare combinations. But don't be alarmed. The vast majority of those spare possibilities you will never face. While there are a couple of dozen "normal" spare combinations, they can be solved by using a minimum of targets and angles.

The first rule of spare shooting involves simple geometry. It is the cross-law principle. When pins are on the left side of the lane, the best starting position is on the right-and vice-versa. Practice four separate spare shots or lines using the cross-lane technique. You develop a separate spare line for each of the back row of pins (7, 8, 9 and 10). There is only one other spare fine to choose from. That is the original line used on the first ball.

Any spare combination can be negotiated using one of those five lines.For example, the line needed for a right-hander to pick up a 1-2-4 leave mimics the line needed to convert the 8-pin. That's because the 8-pin should be positioned directly behind the 2-pin, if all those pins were standing. The 3-6 spare can be converted by using the 9-pin. Any spare leave in which the 5-pin is the key is best made by throwing the ball as if you were going for a strike.

The line for any back row spare shot should do across the third or fourth (middle) arrow or somewhere in between. The stance position varies for each shot. It does not taketricky board counting formulas to become a good spare shooter. Rather, it is the ability to mentally see a cross-lane ball path and execute the shot the way you see it. You’ll get better at executing these shots from practice and experience.

Picking up splits presents a much greater challenge. The margin for error to get one pin to slide into another is less than a half inch. Yes, making splits takes a very precise shot and luck! Even though spare shooting may lack glamour, it should not be overlooked.

Learning to make spares is the surest way to improve your scores.
  • Most bowlers will believe and try any tip you give them to improve their game, particularly if you whisper it in their ear.
  • It is said that humor is rooted in tragedy, like when your opponent throws a channel ball.
    (From Pins and Puns, by Chuck Pezzano, Bowling Digest)


    Here are some suggestions to follow while on the lanes:

Bowling Tips 
If you're one of those folks who bend your elbow too early in the follow through or would like to project the ball further down the lane on certain conditions, try this. Hold your arm down by your side. You'll see a crease on the inside of your elbow where the elbow bends. Think of leading the shot (your hand and ball) with this part of your elbow. You cannot biomechanically do this, of course, unless your elbow bends the opposite way of everyone else's!

What's important is that you think lead with your elbow. Just feel like you are trying to have this crease of your elbow leading your hand toward the target. It will be very difficult to bend your elbow if the crease is going toward the target!

Once you've found your strike line, don't line up for your perfect strike shot. You're not perfect, why line up like you are?   Try moving one board left with your feet. Yes, I really mean it. Line up left of perfect. That way you'll have room to be a little light and maybe even miss slightly right.

Either way you're probably still in the hole and if you don't carry, have most likely left yourself a makeable spare.  You won't believe this tip but it works for a lot of different folks. If you're not sliding as much as you'd like and you are sure it's not the approaches or your shoes that are the problem, tighten the entire lace on your sliding shoe. If you're sliding too much, loosen it!

Copyright. All rights reserved. Strikeability, Inc. 2000-05

Tips by Shadow:

Synthetic lanes
are a challenge with a lot of oil. The oil moves all over the place. Very little disappears. When your normal adjustments don't work, make a drastic move with your feet on the approach and your target on the lane.Don't be a one-release bowler.

Develop a number of releases.  If you want the ball to roll early, then you know what to do.  Just the opposite, if you want to spin it, you know that you can.  Buy a good pair of bowling shoes.  These are the foundation of your feet.  Make sure your non-sliding foot has a full rubber sole or one with a leather tip on the toe.  In other words, don't buy shoes that have sliding soles on both feet.

Beware of the DARK SIDE by Dick Ritger

It comes out of nowhere…just when you least expect it. It takes control and you are at its mercy? Have you never taken the most smooth and effortless approach, and just at the moment of release…the DARK SIDE prevails? Of what do I speak?You know, when some unknown force causes you to let go of the ball far too late and the hand goes way too far around the ball. The result is a ball off line and/or pathetically weak when it hits the pins. Yes, bowlers, anytime you let go of the ball – follow through and as you look at your bowling hand – you see the back portion of it staring you in the face, you can claim to have seen the ‘dark side’. Overturning the ball is an all too common fault many bowlers experience. If this is a problem for you, here are some potential solutions.The source of the problem may be found in a number of areas.

1.     If, when you bowl and relax the thumb pressure, you drop the ball much too soon…add tape to the thumbhole for a more snug fit.

2.    
ARM SWING: An arm swing that is controlled can also contribute to the overturning of the ball at release. It goes hand-in-hand (no pun intended) with establishing the correct grip pressure. To eliminate the control in your swing try this: Experiment to see if your starting position can be improved by moving up in ‘half-shoe’ increments. Take several shots at each new starting spot. You should find one fairly quickly that allows you consistency, balance, and a great release. 3.     One last word about the ’dark side’. Take a piece of white tape and put it on the back of your hand. After each delivery, check your hand in the follow through position. If you see the tape, welcome back to the ‘dark side’. If you don’t see the tape…THAT’S GOOD, and your bowling scores will reflect that positive change in your game.


-----------------


Slide Straight You absolutely must maintain your balance for proper ball delivery.  In order for this to happen, you have to keep your approach and slide perpendicular to the foul line at all times.

Follow Through! I had these two words engraved on one of my bowling balls as a constant reminder. This is probably the single largest contributor to consecutive poor releases. It's not hard to bowl an entire game before you realize that you are not following through. Freeze your arm after release and check it's position after your ball crosses over the mark, it should be about head high with your thumb pointing over it's own shoulder.

Watch Your Ball Cross The Mark It doesn't matter whether you focus on a mark, or on an area of the lane, as long as you focus on something.

"Hold that pose" until your ball crosses over that mark, this will ensure that you are not rushing out of your approach.

Practice, Practice, Practice And when you've finished doing this... practice some more. It's hard to be consistently good at anything, if you only do it once a week. Get a friend to watch your approach, or if possible, set up a video camera. You'll be surprised at what you see!

Have Fun!  I put this in here just in case the other tips do not work. You don't have to average 200 to have a great time!(Gone Bowl’ by Tim)

Shoulders Square

     For consistent deliveries, keep your shoulders square to the foul line at all times. A "dropped" shoulder can send the ball wide every time. This often happens when you rush your approach. Maintain a moderate approach speed and be aware of your shoulders during delivery.

Back Straight

            This is one of the most difficult things to learn how to do automatically, it seems instinctive to bend over when you set down a 16 pound object, but it is very important to keep your back reasonably straight for a consistent delivery.

Arm Straight And Near Body

            Bending your arm at the elbow and swinging it away from your body are main contributors to an inconsistent game. A slight bend at the elbow to obtain lift is all right, as long as the inside of your elbow is pointing down your lane, and not at the snack bar.

Knee Bent

            It might seem natural to begin your slide with a bent knee, and then straighten it as you release the ball. Although this will get you more lift, it's just one more thing you have to get perfect for consistent bowling. Stay down at the foul line for higher scores.


Bowling Terms

Sweeper: A wide-breaking hook, which carries a strike as though the pins were pushed with a broom.
Tap:
When a pin stands on an apparent perfect strike hit. (burner, rap, touch).
Telephone poles:
Heavy pins. "The fire's out": Common expression used when a string of strikes comes to an end.
Thin hit:
A pocket hit when the ball barely touches the headpin.
Three quarter bucket:
Three of the four pins of the bucket; three of the 2-4-5-8, 1-2-3-5, or 3-5-6-9.
Three quarters: Spot where bowlers place ball upon delivery, midway between right corner and center of lane and three-fourths of the width of the lane from the left corner (vice versa for lefties). A popular starting point.
Throwing rocks: Piling up strikes with a speed ball.
Tickler: When the 6-pin gently topples the 10-pin from the channel resulting in a strike; the 6-pin is the "tickler."
Tripped 4:
When the 2 pin takes out the 4 by bouncing off the kickback.
Tumbler: A strike in which the pins appear to fall individually. 
Pick: To knock down only the front pin from a spare leave. (cherry, chop)
Picket fence: The 1-2-4-7 or 1-3-6-10 spares. (rail)
Pocket
: The 1-3 for right-handers and 1-2 for lefties
Point Shot: Start from first arrow and throw over first arrow; ball goes straight at pocket. See also "swing shot"
Poison ivy: The 3-6-10
Poodle: To roll a gutter ball
Powder puff, puff ball: Slow ball that fails to carry the pins.
Powerhouse: A hard, strong ball which strikes
Puddle: A gutter ball
Pull the rug: To have the ball just touch the headpin, at which time the pins appear to dance until the last second when they all seem to collapse at once, resulting in a strike
Pumpkin: Ball thrown without spin that hits soft
Quick eight: A good pocket hit which leaves the 4-7 for right-handers, 6-10 for lefties
 Rail: 1) the 1-2-4-7 or 1-3-6-10 spare; a "little rail" is the rail minus one of the end pins (1, 7, or 10). (picket fence)
Railroad: A wide open split with both pins on the same line (4-6, 7-9, 8-10, 7-10) (hole)
Ringing ten-burner: A shot to the pocket which appears to be fine but leaves the 10-pin.
Rug jerker: A 5-pin that is swept out to the right on a strike ball as if someone had jerked the rug out from under it.
Sandwich game: A 200 game scored by alternating strikes and spares. (Dutch 200)
Scenic route: Path taken by a big curve ball.
Schleifer: Thin-hit strike where pins seem to fall one by one.
Scratch: Without benefit of handicap: actual score.
Short pin: A pin rolling on the alley bed, which just fails to reach and hit a standing pin.
Six-pack: Six strikes in a row.
Sleeper: A pin directly behind another pin; respectively: 8-4, 5-1, 9-3. (barmaid, bicycle, double wood, mother-in-law, one­in­the­dark, tandem)
Snake eyes: The 7-10 split. (bedposts, fence posts, goal posts, mule ears)
Snowplow: A ball that clears all the pins for a strike.
Spiller: A light-hit strike in which the pins seem to melt away, taking a longer time than other strike hits.
Splasher: A strike where the pins are downed quickly.
Strike out: To get all three available strike in the tenth frame or, similarly, finish the game from any point with strikes.
Strike split: The 8-10 for right-handers and the 7-9 for lefties; ball looks good but splits.
Sweeper: A wide-breaking hook, which carries a strike as though the pins were pushed with a broom.
Scenic route: Path taken by a big curve ball.
Schleifer: Thin-hit strike where pins seem to fall one by one.
Scratch: Without benefit of handicap; actual score.
Set: Ball holding in the pocket.
Short pin:
A pin rolling on the alley bed, which just fails to reach and hit a standing pin.
Shotgun shot: Rolling the ball from the hip.
Sidearming; sidewheeling: Allowing the arm to draw away from its proper position during back and forward swing.
Six-pack: Six strikes in a row.
Snake eyes:
The 7-10 split. (bedposts, fence posts, goal posts, mule ears)
Snowplow: A ball that clears all the pins for a strike.
Sour apple: 1) Weak ball which leaves the 5-7, 5-10 or 5-7-10 split; 2) specifically, the 5-7-10 split.
Spiller: A light-hit strike in which the pins seem to melt away, taking a longer time than other strike hits.
Splasher: A strike where the pins are downed quickly.
Steal: To get more pins than you deserve on a strike hit.
Stiff, stiff alley: A lane with a tendency to hold a hook ball back.
Strap the ball: Get maximum lift.
Strike split:
The 8-10 for right-handers and the 7-9 for lefties; ball looks good but splits.
Nothing ball:
Ineffective ball.
One­in­the­dark:
Rear pin in the 1-5, 2-8 or 3-9 spare. (barmaid, bicycle, double wood, mother-in-law, sleeper, tandem)
On the nose:
A head-on hit to the headpin; frequently causes a split.
Open: A frame that doesn¹t have a strike or spare. (blow, error, miss)
Out and in: A wide hook rolled from the center of the lane toward the gutter; the ball hooks back to the pocket, going out, then in.
Out of bounds: Area on the lanes where the ball won't make it back to the pocket.
Outside: Corner or near corner position of playing lanes; use is not as extreme as "gutter shot."
Over: In professional bowling, 200 per game is considered "par." The number of pins above 200 is the number of pins "over", or in the black.
Over-turn: To apply too much spin to the ball and not enough finger lift, preventing the ball from having proper action. When the thumb stays in too long, the ball is said to be overturned. The thumb should come out first, allowing the fingers to lift the ball forward and spin it to the side.
Pack: A full count of ten.
Par: 200 game; bowling over or under "par", etc.
Part of the building:
Expression referring to the 7, 8 or 10 pin when it stands after what seems to be a perfect hit (part of the house).
Perfect game: Twelve strikes in a row with a count of 30 pins per frame resulting in a score of 300.

Looper:
An extra-wide hook ball, usually slow.
Loose hit:
A light pocket hit, closer to directly in the 3-pin rather than on the headpin, as opposed to a high hit.
Love tap:
A tap from a moving pin, usually off the wall/sideboard, which delicately knocks it down.
Low:
Light or thin hit on the headpin ("low in the pocket"), as opposed to a high hit.
Makeable split: Any split, which does not have the two pins closest to the foul line parallel with each other.
Maples: Pins. Mark: 1) A strike or spare; 2) the point on the lane where the bowler intends to put the ball down or otherwise use as a target.
Messenger:
A pin that comes rolling across the lane after most or all of the others have fallen.
Mister Average: Name given to an absent bowler (whose average is used).
It's Mrs. Average if the bowler is a lady.
Mixer:
Ball with action causing the pins to bounce around.
Mother-in-law: 1) The 7 pin; 2) the back pin in a sleeper situation.
Move in: To start from or near the center of the approach.
Move out: To start from or near a corner position on the approach.
Mule ears: The 7-10 split. (Bedposts, fence posts, goal posts, snake eyes)
Murphy: Baby split (2-7, 3-10).
Key pin: front of target pin of any leave, (when there is no wood shot.)
Kickbacks: Side partitions between lanes at the pit end. On many hits the pins bounce from the kickback knocking additional pins down. (sideboards)
Kick off: Smooth, effective ball delivery.
Kill the ball: Take the spin or action off the ball by not lifting or spinning at the release so that it runs straight and maximizes accuracy.
Kindling wood: Light pins.
Kingpin: The headpin or the number 5 pin, varying with local usage.
Kresge: Whereas the 5-10 split is called the Woolworth or Dime Store, the 5-7 is often called the Kresge. (Trivia – Kresge was a chain of retail and discount stores which eventually became K Mart.)
Lift: Upward motion on the ball at the point of release. (As the ball rolls from the fingers of the up swinging hand, spin is imparted to help drive the ball.)
Light hit: A ball hitting mostly the side of the pin deflecting it sideways.
Lofting: Throwing the ball too high above the lane bed.
Honey
: A good ball.
Hot
: When a bowler or team starts lining up strikes.
Inside
: A starting point near the center of the lane (as opposed to the outside, near the edge of the lane) usually referring to the point of release.
In there: A good pocket hit.
Jack Manders
: Rolling through the middle of a 7-10 or any wide split.(field goal)
Jam
: Force the ball high into the pocket.
Jersey, Jersey side: To the left of the headpin (for right-handers, and vice versa for lefties).
Clothesline
(also picket fence).  The 1-2-4-7 or 1-3-6-10 pins still standing after the first ball.
Dutch 200. A game of exactly 200 by alternately rolling spares and strikes.
Field goal. A missed throw between widely separated pins hitting nothing but air
Four bagger. Throwing four strikes in a row.
Goal posts. The 7-10 split. (Same as Bed posts.)
High hit
. A solid hit on a pin due to contact near its front center; hitting too much head pin on a strike attempt.
Brooklyn - (also crossover). Refers to a ball that crosses over to the other side of the
headpin opposite the side it was thrown (i.e. a Brooklyn strike hit the 1-2 pocket for a right-hander).
Bucket
  -The 2-4-5-8 or 3-5-6-9 leave after the first throw.
Cherry -
To pick off the front pin or pins but leaving the back pin or
pins on a spare attempt
Christmas tree - The 3-7-10 split for a right-hander; 2-7-10 split for a left-hander.

Baby split
. The 2-7 or 3-10 split.
Backup ball. A ball that curves left to right for a right-handed bowler or right to left for a left-handed bowler.
Bed posts. The 7-10 split.
Big four
(also double pinochle). The 4-6-7-10 split.

BOWLING TIPS

Follow Through!
I had these two words engraved on one of my bowling balls as a constant reminder
This is probably the single largest contributor to consecutive poor releases.
•It's not hard to bowl an entire game before you realize that you are not following through.
•Freeze your arm after release and check it's position after your ball crosses over the mark.
•The ball should be about head high with your thumb pointing over it's own shoulder
.
Tim Winkfein (gonebowlin.com)

Shoulders Square

•For consistent deliveries, keep your shoulders square to the foulline at all times.
•A "dropped" shoulder can send the ball wide everytime. This often happens when you rush your approach.
•Maintain amoderate approach speed and be aware of your shoulders during delivery.


Be considerate of other bowlers

•Be prepared to take your regular turn on the lanes.
If another bowler is on the lane to your immediate left or right, do not advance to the foul line until the bowler has completed the shot.
Stay in your own approach area.
Step back off the approach after making each delivery.

Hand Position:

I think the natural hook handshake position is the best way to go since it allows you the freest and loosest arm swing.
•In the stance hold the ball in a 45-degree hand position (hand partially under ball and partially to the side of ball, the tips of the pinkies from both hands should be touching).


spares
:
•On single pin spares, throw a straight ball rather than a hook.
•Practice a straight shot if you don't have one and use it for those single pin spares. Hooking requires you to cover more boards so there's more room for error.
•***Picking up Spares If you're consistently leaving certain pin combinations, you can lower or raise the position of your ball in you stance. This increases or diminishes your swing slightly.


Develop Your Own Bowling Style

•There is no right or wrong way to bowl and anything can work if you are able to repeat it often enough.
•Do what works for you and feels the most comfortable.
Often times you have to do something, that may be considered unorthodox, to compensate for a flaw in your game.
*Many great bowlers had very unorthodox styles such as Don Carter with his bent arm swing.

*  *  *  *  *
Develop Good Practice Routine
•Analyze your delivery and think about what you are doing when you practice.
•Feel your good shots when you make them and imprint it into your mind so that you can repeat them.
•Use visualization to practice off the lanes and go through the delivery in your mind making perfect shots.

* * * * *
Following Through The Swing:

The follow through is just a continuation of the arm swing after the release.
If the ball is released right your arm will unhinge at the elbow and your hand will come up to side of your face or head.
If you quit on the ball and don't follow through it means your release is weak.
A weak release is caused by bad arm swing and timing during the approach.

Watch Professional Bowlers On TV:
- Watch the professional bowlers on TV and record them with your VCR.
-Play back the tape and watch in slow motion.
-Study how they do the basics to improve your own game
-The women pros are great to watch because they rely on finesse over power. 

Picking up Spares
If you're consistently leaving certain pin combinations, you can lower or raise
the position of your ball in your stance. This increases or diminishes your swing slightly.
*********
- ARMSWING ALIGNMENT -
-Make sure your armswing and elbow are close to the side of your body during the armswing(esp. the forward swing) to have accuracy and leverage at release. To do this visualize (picture) your elbow being as close as possible to the side of your body during the entire armswing.
FEEL YOUR GOOD SHOTS
- Bowling is a game of repetition -

• You need to repeat your good shots.
•You do this by feeling your good shots when you make them, memorizing that feeling and trying to repeat it again.

- Staying Relaxed Under Pressure -
Once you're set up and ready to go focus your eyes on your target and block out all external noise.
Don't think about the mechanics of your physical game, just bowl reflexively and react to the target as you release the ball.
- Release -
The release is probably the most important part of your game.
• Remember to always try to keep your palm facing upwards when releasing the ball.
•Your hand almost always rotates around the ball when your thumb releases.
•Most bowlers do not understand how to make a ball hook, it's not by "Spinning"...it's by rolling end over end by staying behind the ball.


- SPARE MAKING
-
Face spares with your feet and shoulders when you line up to shoot at them.
Also keep your hand in the natural hook position (10-11o'clock) and keep your wrist straight and loose.
Don't use wrist snap release on spares. Go straight at them.

* * * * * *
FREE ARM SWING
-
Keep a relaxed grip in the ball (don't squeeze fingers or esp. the thumb) and swing the ball from your shoulder joint using the weight of the ball for a long, loose, arm swing. Also it's important that your ball is drilled and fitted properly so that your thumb and fingers fit snuggly in the ball so you can keep them relaxed. Keeping your fingers and thumb relaxed in the ball at all times is the key to a free arm swing!

* * * * *
LANE CONDITIONS
If the lanes get drier move to the left on the approach and try to play the same target.
If the lanes are oilier move to the right on the approach and try to play the same target.
***********************
USE YOUR BODY LEVERAGE:
•On the last step bend your knee to get down lower to the lane and slide your foot straight towards the foul line making sure it does not turn.
•Think of it as sliding into a deep knee bend.
•Counter balance your body by moving your non-sliding leg sideways to the opposite side of your bowling arm.
•Make sure you keep your upper body fairly erect as you get down low to the lane.
*************************************
Staying Relaxed Under Pressure
Once you're set up and ready to go focus your eyes on your target and block out all external noise.
Don't think about the mechanics of your physical game, just bowl reflexively and react to the target as you release the ball.
***************************


-The Knox league bowls from September to May,
at Fairfax Circle Bowl America, 9699 Lee Hwy, each Tuesday at 6:30 PM.

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